Asia Blog

Annapurna Region, Nepal - November 3rd

Flying today from Khatmandu to Lukla, the gateway to the Everest region. 

The day got off to an interesting start. We arrived at airport at 9:30am for flight to Lukla. Flight was supposed to leave at 10:30. Still sitting there at 1:00. Winds in Lukla causing all flights to be cancelled. Same the next day, by the way. No planes out to Lukla. Pasang, my guide who was flying with me from Kathmandu, found us another way to get there.

So far I’ve not posted pictures of "this is what my room looked like", or "heres what i had for dinner" ….instead I've only posted images that I hope will give  a feeling for the land, the people, and the culture. But this one I had to post….

This is the vehicle that drove us to the aircraft.

This is the vehicle that drove us to the aircraft.

This was my ride!

This was my ride!

This is Major Tom, our pilot. He's the only one wearing a helmet. What does he know that we don't? Check out the reflection in his visor if you haven't seen it already.

This is Major Tom, our pilot. He's the only one wearing a helmet. What does he know that we don't? Check out the reflection in his visor if you haven't seen it already.

Nothing to worry about, Ganesha, the Hindu Elephant God, Lord of Success, is our co-pilot today.

Nothing to worry about, Ganesha, the Hindu Elephant God, Lord of Success, is our co-pilot today.

On the ground in Lukla. While the Hindu religion dominates Nepal by a significant margin, in the Everest region it is almost all Bhudist. 

On the ground in Lukla. While the Hindu religion dominates Nepal by a significant margin, in the Everest region it is almost all Bhudist. 

Yaks also use suspension bridges, sometimes if it was a large group of them, we'd have to wait 15 minutes to cross.

Yaks also use suspension bridges, sometimes if it was a large group of them, we'd have to wait 15 minutes to cross.

These are called Manis. As in Om Mani Podni.... These prayers are carved by hand into a flat piece of rock. Makes you wonder about how they do things here versus how we do it at home. 

These are called Manis. As in Om Mani Podni.... These prayers are carved by hand into a flat piece of rock. Makes you wonder about how they do things here versus how we do it at home. 

Stuart Zaro