Asia Blog

Everest Region, Nepal - November 5th

We woke early that morning and climbed to a high view point, again to see the mountains at sunrise. This time it was Everest. Wherever I went in Nepal, every time I looked up there was another magnificent beautiful snow capped peak. There are so many. They make everything else appear so small. They loom over every village I’ve been to, like Gods.

Everest was first conquered by Sir Edmund Hillary in 1953 with his Sherpa, Tenzing Norgay, they are both honored and memorialized at the view point. I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been. It still is extremely difficult now, and thats with North Face, warm clothing, and sleeping bags that stand up to below zero temperatures. So many have died since trying to reach the peak. Following his ascent of Everest he devoted much of his life to helping the Sherpa people of Nepal. Through his efforts many schools and hospitals were built in this remote region of the Himalayas. He is a revered man in Nepal. 

 

Everest is the peak on the left. 29,029 feet high.

Everest is the peak on the left. 29,029 feet high.

Statue of Sir Edmund Hillary in the foreground.

Statue of Sir Edmund Hillary in the foreground.

View to the east from same location a bit earlier. 

View to the east from same location a bit earlier. 

After Everest we visited a preliminary school. Almost all children attend school. They wear uniforms (i may have said that before, so forgive me, everything is beginning to jumble together).  Before school they line up by grade on he football (soccer) field where they do exercises, sing the National Nepalese Song, and are spoken to over a microphone. I obviously didn't understand a word. Some older students beat drums to pace the exercise. The students above are one of the youngest groups.

To prove I was there, and not sitting by the pool on St Barts drinking martinis, pulling pictures off the interent....

To prove I was there, and not sitting by the pool on St Barts drinking martinis, pulling pictures off the interent....

Prayer wheels at a Monastery.

Prayer wheels at a Monastery.

Very large prayer wheel - about ten feet high.

After the school Pasang, my guide and I made a quick stop at the Sherpa Museum in Namche Village. This picture and the few below are from that. Its a Sherpa home that has been meticulously maintained throughout the years.  I’ve included them because I think the textures are fabulous and it gives you insight into the Sherpa people. They have character. Sherpas by the way do not mean someone who carries bags and merchandise up the mountain. They are a people who live in Nepal, mostly in this Everest area. Just because someone is a Sherpa doesn't mean they accompany trekkers and carry their bags.

After the school Pasang, my guide and I made a quick stop at the Sherpa Museum in Namche Village. This picture and the few below are from that. Its a Sherpa home that has been meticulously maintained throughout the years.  I’ve included them because I think the textures are fabulous and it gives you insight into the Sherpa people. They have character. Sherpas by the way do not mean someone who carries bags and merchandise up the mountain. They are a people who live in Nepal, mostly in this Everest area. Just because someone is a Sherpa doesn't mean they accompany trekkers and carry their bags.

The craftsmanship is remarkable. Everything is cut, stitched, and decorated by hand with simple primitive tools. They have stood the test of time, and grow more beautiful each year.

Stuart Zaro